DELIGHT · ENGAGE · CONNECT · SERVE
Ask Postcard_Front.png

DELIGHT

New Series - Next Sunday (April 28) we will begin a short series, ASK: Questions Christians Must Answer. Pick up a schedule on your way out.

ENGAGE

Global Outreach - You are invited to hear about the exciting things that Bruce is doing in Brazil—April 28 from 4 - 5:30 p.m. in the West Linn Fellowship Hall. We will enjoy a light Brazilian meal! If possible, please text your RSVP to Bruce (503-457-5468).

CONNECT

ReGeneration meets next Sunday at 7 p.m. at the West Linn Campus. We will celebrate the Gospel, pursue Jesus, eat dinner, and develop a community of young adults.

 WEST LINN

Men’s Breakfast - Saturday, April 27, at 8 a.m. in the West Linn Fellowship Hall (basement). Text RSVP to Billy Ferguson (503-956-2922).

Women, 1st Thursday CONNECT is May 2, 6:30-8:30 p.m. at New Life Church. Dinner will be a salad bar—please bring a favorite topping!

Kim BrandstetterComment
Lent: Maundy Thursday
Maundy Thursday 19.jpg

Maundy Thursday commemorates the night Jesus shared the Last Supper with his disciples and was betrayed. It was on this day that Jesus inaugurated Communion as an on-going practice for Jesus-Followers to remember his death, and anticipate his return (Mark 14:12-21). Maundy (from Latin “mandatum,” meaning “commandment,”) Thursday also commemorates the night that Jesus washed his disciples’ feet, commanding them to follow his example (John 13:1-20).

We have created a resource to help you celebrate communion in your homes this Maundy Thursday (Download Communion Guide). At some point during your feast and communion celebration, you may also want to wash one another’s feet. This act of physical, practical service—though not meeting a practical need today as it did in Jesus’ day—reminds Christians that being spiritually washed by Jesus is the sole basis for belonging to him (John 13:8). If you choose to engage in this practice this Thursday, may your short and simple act of service cause you to think of Jesus and exclaim with Peter, “Lord, not my feet only but also my hands and my head!” For each of us desperately needs Jesus to wash each part of us, making each part of us his.


Good Friday 19 Invitation.jpg

On Friday, April 19, you are invited to join us for dinner at 6:00 p.m. in the basement at the West Linn Campus. The Good Friday service will begin at 7:00 p.m. in the sanctuary, and we will reflect upon Jesus’ death and all it accomplished as we sing, pray, retell the story, and celebrate the Lord’s Supper together.


Holy Saturday 19.jpg

On Saturday, April 20, the Church celebrates “Holy Saturday,” somberly remembering the day that Jesus spent in the tomb, while He—by his death—was breaking the power of sin, Satan, and demons. Consider spending the day, or part of the day, fasting or in silence, lamenting Jesus’ death and the sealed tomb and growing in expectation of Jesus’ resurrection.

Taylor ReavelyComment
Lent: Jesus Saves

In this season of Lent leading up to Easter, we review the significant events of Jesus ministry leading up to his death and resurrection. On Palm Sunday, we paused to reflect on the triumphal entry:

Mark 11:1–10 “Now when they drew near to Jerusalem, to Bethphage and Bethany, at the Mount of Olives, Jesus sent two of his disciples and said to them, “Go into the village in front of you, and immediately as you enter it you will find a colt tied, on which no one has ever sat. Untie it and bring it. If anyone says to you, ‘Why are you doing this?’ say, ‘The Lord has need of it and will send it back here immediately.’” And they went away and found a colt tied at a door outside in the street, and they untied it. And some of those standing there said to them, “What are you doing, untying the colt?” And they told them what Jesus had said, and they let them go. And they brought the colt to Jesus and threw their cloaks on it, and he sat on it. And many spread their cloaks on the road, and others spread leafy branches that they had cut from the fields. And those who went before and those who followed were shouting, “Hosanna! Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord! Blessed is the coming kingdom of our father David! Hosanna in the highest!”

As Jesus enters Jerusalem, the people are singing and rejoicing. They have heard of his great teaching and have asked, “What is this? A new teaching with authority!” They have seen his miraculous works and have asked, “Who then is this, that even the wind and the sea obey him?” Many have concluded that this must be the promised messiah, the Son of David who would come to save God’s people. 

As Jesus enters Jerusalem, they sing Psalm 118, “Hosanna!” (That is, “save us we ask!”) Blessed is the coming Kingdom of our father David!” Earlier we saw that Jesus ministry began by proclaiming the near coming of this kingdom. These people believe that Jesus has come to do it. 

Psalm 118 rehearses the steadfast love of the Lord. In it God’s people rejoice in the salvation that the Lord brought to Israel, they acknowledge the enemies that currently plague them, and they anticipate the coming salvation of the Lord saying, “I shall not die, but I shall live, and recount the deeds of the Lord.” What they don’t understand is how this salvation will take place. They anticipate a military conquest and a national rise to power like that of David. The actual fulfillment of this Psalm will be as Jesus has been trying to explain to his disciples; that he will go to Jerusalem, be handed over to the Romans, be crucified, and finally he will rise again. The disciples don’t understand and will abandon him. The crowds will be disenfranchised and turn on him; first hailing him as messiah, then calling for his crucifixion. 

All this took place to fulfill the prophecy of Psalm 118:26-29, “Blessed is he who comes in the name of the LORD! We bless you from the house of the LORD. The LORD is God, and he has made his light to shine upon us. Bind the festal sacrifice with cords, up to the horns of the altar. You are my God, and I will give thanks to you; you are my God; I will extol you. Oh give thanks to the LORD, for he is good; for his steadfast love endures forever!” Jesus came in the name of the LORD, he was bound and sacrificed as the perfect Passover lamb. We are saved, not from physical enemies, but from our sin. We are saved, not by military power, but by Jesus’ humble sacrifice. We are brought in, not to a geographical kingdom, but to a spiritual, heavenly kingdom.

They may not have understood all that they were saying that day that Jesus went up to Jerusalem, but Jesus knew what must take place. Now we, with greater understanding, give the same cry to our Savior, “Hosanna! Save us we pray!” Now we, with greater understanding, sing the same praises to our God, “Blessed is he who comes in the name of the LORD.” Now we, with greater understanding, give thanks to the LORD, for he is good; for his steadfast love endures forever!”

Taylor ReavelyComment
DELIGHT · ENGAGE · CONNECT · SERVE
Photo by    sergio souza    on    Unsplash

ENGAGE

Global Outreach - You are invited to hear about the exciting things that Bruce is doing in Brazil—April 28 from 4 - 5:30 p.m. in the West Linn Fellowship Hall. We will enjoy a light Brazilian meal! If possible, please text your RSVP to Bruce (503-457-5468).

Kim BrandstetterComment
Lent: Listen To Jesus

As we continue to rehearse Jesus’ life during the season of Lent, Mark includes a strange and glorious scene:

Mark 9:2–8 “And after six days Jesus took with him Peter and James and John, and led them up a high mountain by themselves. And he was transfigured before them, and his clothes became radiant, intensely white, as no one on earth could bleach them. And there appeared to them Elijah with Moses, and they were talking with Jesus. And Peter said to Jesus, ‘Rabbi, it is good that we are here. Let us make three tents, one for you and one for Moses and one for Elijah.’ For he did not know what to say, for they were terrified. And a cloud overshadowed them, and a voice came out of the cloud, ‘This is my beloved Son; listen to him.’ And suddenly, looking around, they no longer saw anyone with them but Jesus only.”

This is one of the key moments in the ministry of Jesus. This is a moment where the God-Man was revealed to be, in fact, gloriously God. The vast majority of his life it was obvious that he was indeed a man, but during this moment on the mountain Peter, James, and John witnessed Jesus in a moment of his glory—a moment of God revealing his glory, flexing his God-ness, showing how incredibly he had humbled himself to be our servant in human flesh, showing that he shines as the creator God. 

In the midst of this revealing, God the Father says of Jesus, “This is my beloved Son; listen to him.”  

Few reject that Jesus existed. That he was a man who walked and talked and taught some benign teachings. But the astounding reality is that Jesus is the Son of God, a member of the Trinity, who humbled himself to be a servant to humanity—loving, serving, feeding, teaching, and proclaiming the kingdom of God, and, ultimately, sealing the victory of the kingdom of God by his death and resurrection. 

Because he is the Son of God, God himself has told us to listen to him. When he teaches, you ought to listen. When he proclaims that the Kingdom of God has arrived with him, you ought to listen. When he foretells that he will die and rise again, you ought to listen. And when he commands his followers to go into all the world proclaiming the Gospel—the good news of his work—and making disciples, you ought to listen. 

When Jesus talks we do not hear another simply human teacher whose opinion can sit aside all other teachers, thinkers, or leaders of all time. But instead we hear the Son of God, humbly serving, speaking truth—ultimate, reality-changing truth. Listen to him. 

What words of Jesus have you neglected or ignored? Confess areas where you have deafened yourself to Jesus’ voice. Repent and ponder that Jesus is God and let that influence the way you listen to what he says.


Maundy Thursday 19.jpg

On Thursday, April 18, the Church celebrates “Maundy Thursday,” the day prior to Jesus’ death on which he celebrated the Last Supper with his disciples and was betrayed by Judas. You are encouraged to somberly conclude your evening by celebrating the Lord’s Supper in your home with your family. Stay tuned for further instructions and resources.


Good Friday 19.jpg

On Friday, April 19, you are invited to join us for dinner at 6:00 p.m. in the basement at the West Linn Campus. The Good Friday service will begin at 7:00 p.m. in the sanctuary, and we will reflect upon Jesus’ death and all it accomplished as we sing, pray, retell the story, and celebrate the Lord’s Supper together.


Holy Saturday 19.jpg

On Saturday, April 20, the Church celebrates “Holy Saturday,” somberly remembering the day that Jesus spent in the tomb, while He—by his death—was breaking the power of sin, Satan, and demons. Consider spending the day, or part of the day, fasting or in silence, lamenting Jesus’ death and the sealed tomb and growing in expectation of Jesus’ resurrection.


Easter 19.jpg

Our season of Lent will conclude on the morning of April 21, as we break fast and celebrate Jesus’ resurrection together. You are invited to join us at one of our Easter Gatherings (9:00 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. at the West Linn campus; 10 a.m. at the Wilsonville campus.) Invitations are available in the church lobby to help you invite a friend.

Taylor ReavelyComment
DELIGHT · ENGAGE · CONNECT · SERVE

DELIGHT

Good Friday 19 Invitation.jpg

Good Friday - April 19, you are invited to join us for dinner at 6:00 p.m. in the basement at the West Linn Campus. The service will begin at 7:00 p.m. in the sanctuary.

Easter Sunday Services will be at 9:00 and 10:45 a.m. in West Linn and 10:00 a.m. in Wilsonville. Pick up invitations at the church to invite your friends and neighbors.

WEST LINN

Baby Dedication - We are having a baby dedication on May 12. If you are interested in dedicating your child to the Lord, please email the church office (office@newlifenw.com).

CONNECT

Luncheon - You are invited to attend the “2nd Wednesday Senior Luncheon” this Wednesday, April 10 at 12:30 p.m. in the West Linn Fellowship Hall. Please bring a dish to share.

WILSONVILLE

Women's Gathering - Please join us on Monday, April 15 at 6:30 p.m. for fun, food, and fellowship. If you have any questions, please contact Sheila Brownell.

Church News - If you would like to receive church news, prayer requests, Day of Prayer and Fasting information, and other church communication signup online today.

DELIGHT · ENGAGE · CONNECT · SERVE

DELIGHT

Day of Prayer and Fasting - Please join us in a day of prayer and fasting on Wednesday, April 3. Look for prayer requests on the church blog or in the newsletter.

CONNECT

ReGeneration meets Sunday, March 31 at 7 p.m. at the West Linn Campus.

WEST LINN

Women, 1st Thursday CONNECT is April 4, 6:30-8:30 p.m. at New Life Church. It's spring-cleaning time! Bring 3-5 items to swap from any of these categories: books, kitchen/pantry, gardening/plants, women's clothing/accessories, home decor. Bring a Bible and come prepared for speed-dusting, learning from 1 Samuel, and launching the book of Acts. RSVP on Facebook, Remind, or text Marcia at 503-720-7197.

WILSONVILLE

Shared Meal after the worship service Sunday, April 7. Please join us and bring a main dish and a side dish (salad, fruit, dessert, etc.) to share with others. Your generous contributions allow us to be hospitable to guests who may wish to join us. This is a great time to connect and reconnect with one another.

Kim BrandstetterComment
Lent: Follow Jesus

During the season of Lent at New Life Church, we are rehearsing the life of Jesus, pausing to reflect at each major junction in Jesus’ journey to the cross. Immediately after Jesus’ baptism, he was tempted in the wilderness. When he returns, he bursts onto the scene preaching a revolutionary message:

Mark 1:14 “The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God is at hand; repent and believe in the gospel.”

Finally, after long waiting, the Old Testament promises of God have found their fulfillment in the arrival of the Messiah, Jesus. God himself has come to establish his kingly rule on earth as it is in heaven. Jesus’ message calls all people to repent (turning away from their idolatrous rebellion against the true King) and believe the gospel (turning toward the “Good News” that God has come to reconcile repentant and believing people to himself and each other through the work of Jesus). Repentance and belief in the gospel re-aligns the repenter-and-believer to God and God’s Way in a manner synonymous with Jesus’ call to “Follow me.”

Mark 1:16-20 “Passing alongside the Sea of Galilee, [Jesus] saw Simon and Andrew the brother of Simon casting a net into the sea, for they were fishermen. And Jesus said to them, ‘Follow me, and I will make you become fishers of men.’ And immediately they left their nets and followed him. And going on a little farther, he saw James the son of Zebedee and John his brother, who were in their boat mending the nets. And immediately he called them, and they left their father Zebedee in the boat with the hired servants and followed him.”

Characteristic of the action-packed Gospel of Mark, the first Jesus-followers respond to Jesus’ call by immediately leaving their nets (James and John left their dad in the boat!) Mark portrays this forsaking of career and community as being done “immediately,” so we subconsciously impose the meaning “easily” and conclude that following Jesus must be easy.

Still today, Jesus is calling people everywhere, saying “Follow me!” Perhaps when you hear his voice, you can picture yourself jumping out of the boat, leaving family behind and throwing caution to the wind, to follow Jesus—because it must be “easy.” But if you know your own heart, that picture doesn’t accurately reflect the real internal struggle to follow Jesus. No, instead of “immediately” following Jesus with a reckless abandon, we calculate, we doubt, we turn back, we fall fearfully out of the boat instead of jumping out, we interview Jesus first, we linger awhile, and only then do we maybe, actually follow him. And even when we do follow him, often our Simon-like aspiration looks more like Simon than we like to admit—denying that we even know Jesus (Mark 14:66-72).

We consider Jesus’ Way—for example, “Welcome one another as Christ has welcomed you” (Romans 15:7)—and we invent a thousand excuses: "I am too busy, too tired, introverted, don’t know anyone, don’t have a big enough house, don’t like to cook, don’t like to clean up someone else’s mess, don’t like people different than me, don’t think anyone would want to be with me, don’t think the result will be worth the trouble…”

The Church is a place where Jesus-followers can freely admit their difficulty in following him. Side by side, we struggle to follow King Jesus in Jesus’ Way. Together, we repent of our failure to follow Jesus; together, we confess our excuses; and together, we believe the Gospel, which we so desperately need daily.

This week, reflect on the things that keep you from following Jesus “immediately” and confess them to God, agreeing with him that they are illegitimate, albeit real and painful, barriers. Repent of those things, and turn from them. Believe the Gospel that God has come to do in you and through you what you are unable to do yourself, and that life lived Jesus’ Way will always be worth it.

During this season of Lent, may the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace in believing, so that by the power of the Holy Spirit you may abound in hope.

DELIGHT · ENGAGE · CONNECT · SERVE
Photo by  Aida Solomon  on  Unsplash

Photo by Aida Solomon on Unsplash

CONNECT

ReGeneration meets next Sunday (March 31) at 7 p.m. at the West Linn Campus. We will celebrate the Gospel, pursue Jesus, eat dinner, and develop a community of young adults. 

 WEST LINN

Men’s Breakfast - Saturday, March 30, at 8 a.m. in the West Linn Fellowship Hall (basement). Suggested donation of $5. Text RSVP to Billy Ferguson (503-956-2922).

Kim BrandstetterComment
Lent: All Is Not Right With Us

For forty days the Church around the world celebrates the season of Lent. Why forty? Primarily, that number was chosen to commemorate Jesus’ forty day temptation in the wilderness in which he resisted Satan, demonstrating his allegiance to God in his journey to the cross. The account of Jesus’ temptation in the Gospel of Mark which we read on Sunday morning is one of the lesser-detailed accounts of his temptation, and certainly contains some strange details regarding the wild animals and the ministry of angels:

Mark 1:12-13, “The Spirit immediately drove [Jesus] out into the wilderness. And he was in the wilderness forty days, being tempted by Satan. And he was with the wild animals, and the angels were ministering to him.” 

The point of the passage is not in the details, however. One of the reasons Jesus was tempted was to demonstrate his humanity. Humanity is tempted daily with the allures of comfort and power—Jesus faced the same temptations. Another reason, however, was to demonstrate his divinity. Jesus spoke with the authority of God’s Word and though tempted, resisted Satan and did not sin.

Because Jesus—fully human and fully divine—was tempted, yet without sin, the author of Hebrews concludes:

Hebrews 4:13-16, “Since then we have a great high priest who has passed through the heavens, Jesus, the Son of God, let us hold fast our confession. For we do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but one who in every respect has been tempted as we are, yet without sin. Let us then with confidence draw near to the throne of grace, that we may receive mercy and find grace to help in time of need.”

The implications of Jesus’ temptation are good news for the Church. We admit, as a church, that while all is not right in the world, similarly, all is not right in us. We are too willing to bend our knee to Satan and serve the gods of comfort or power. We need to be made right with God, in desperate need of a priest who will present us before God as righteous. No human priest can accomplish this for all broken people everywhere, because all human priests are likewise imperfect, limited to a specific place, and then die. Jesus, by living the life we were unable to live (without sin), dying the death we deserved to die (in our place), and rising to give new life to all who follow him, serves as our Great High Priest and makes us right with God

This week, take note of every temptation and remember that you are not alone in your temptation. Pause to consider on your response, looking to Jesus as your example. And when you fail, confess—naming your sin and agreeing with God about it—to your Great High Priest who sympathizes, and “draw near to the throne of grace to find help in time of need.”

May the God of endurance and encouragement give you hope as you imitate Jesus during this season of Lent.